elderberry syrup lollipops with lavender and lemon balm
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Elderberry Lollipops (with lemon balm & lavender)


These heavenly elderberry lollipops, made with elderberry syrup, lemon balm, and lavender, are just the thing to help little ones through a nasty cold!
Servings: 10

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup fresh lavender (or heaping tablespoon dried)
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon balm (or heaping tablespoon dried)
  • 1/2 cup elderberry syrup
  • 1 cup organic honey
  • candy thermometer, or glass with cold water (to test for hard-crack stage)

Instructions

  • Start by brewing a very strong tea with the lavender and lemon balm. Add herbs to a small pan or kettle with 8 ounces of water, and simmer for ten minutes, or until you feel you have a good, very strong tea. Strain.
  • While your tea brews, it's a good chance to set out your lollipop molds on an even, flat surface. Place the lollipop sticks in each mold.
  • Now, add 1/2 cup of the strained tea, along with the elderberry syrup, and honey, to a small saucepan.
  • Simmer on low, stirring frequently, until mixture starts trying to foam up. At this point, start stirring constantly (with a spoon, rather than a whisk), and closely monitor the temperature. You want to reach 300 degrees and the "hard-crack" stage - but not go past it!
    If you don't have a candy thermometer, follow the guidelines here to start testing using the cold water method, and test every couple of minutes. You're looking to reach the "hard-crack" stage.
    Even if you have a candy thermometer, it's a GREAT idea to have a glass of cold water on hand anyway, to double-check that your mixture is in fact at the hard-crack stage when your thermometer reads 300 degrees.
  • When the mixture reached hard-crack, at 300 degrees, remove pan from heat. Working quickly, pour into lollipop molds. I find a soup spoon also works really well for this if you're nervous pouring from the pan. A heat-resistant spatula can be helpful for coaxing the last of the mixture from the pan.
  • Lest lollipops rest perfectly still until fully cool and hard - about half an hour.